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home : birding w/don reimer : birding w/don reimer
January 29, 2020


5/22/2008 2:00:00 PM
House Wren -
A House Wren, photographed at Pine State Arboretum in Augusta last summer  Photo by Don Reimer
A House Wren, photographed at Pine State Arboretum in Augusta last summer Photo by Don Reimer
Spring Kit  Don Reimer spotted this fox kit beside the road in Union over the weekend. One entrance to the den is inches from the pavement; the opposite entrance is down a hillside.
Spring Kit Don Reimer spotted this fox kit beside the road in Union over the weekend. One entrance to the den is inches from the pavement; the opposite entrance is down a hillside.
by Don Reimer


With boundless physical energy and incessant song, the energetic little House Wren is an appealing backyard visitor. Arriving here in May, male House Wrens begin to advertise their nesting territory with a "bubbling series of complicated whistled notes and trills." Like other wren species, House Wrens often cock their tail up over their back. These cavity-nesting wrens will use a variety of nest sites, including mailboxes, flower pots and nest boxes. This species has one of the largest nesting ranges of any song bird, extending from Canada to South America. House Wrens prefer suburban neighborhoods with lots of edge habitat and dense, shrubby cover nearby. Male wrens might be categorized as "over-achievers" as they cram every nest box in the vicinity with small sticks. This helps to exclude competitors and reduce physical conflicts with other small birds. At times, these spunky wrens may puncture and remove the eggs of competing birds. When the female arrives, she must actually remove a few sticks from the chosen nest site and then add the grassy lining. The House Wren is perhaps one of the few bird species (including Brown-headed Cowbirds) that has benefited from widespread habitat fragmentation, since fragmentation creates more edge habitat along wooded margins.





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